Susan Speer

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Susan Speer
Other names Sue Speer
Academic background
Alma mater Loughborough University
Academic work
Institutions University of Manchester
Main interests Psychology
Website University of Manchester

Susan "Sue" Speer C.Psychol, FHEA is a senior lecturer at the School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester.[1]

From 2005 to 2006 Speer was an ESRC-SSRC collaborative visiting fellow in the department of sociology at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA).[2]

Selected bibliography[edit]

Forthcoming[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Speer, Susan (2005). Gender talk: feminism, discourse and conversation analysis. London New York: Routledge. ISBN 9780415246446. 
  • Speer, Susan A.; Stokoe, Elizabeth (2011). Conversation and gender. Cambridge New York: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 9780521696036. 

Chapters in books[edit]

  • Speer, Susan A.; Potter, Jonathan (2002), "From performatives to practices: Judith Butler, discursive psychology, and the management of heterosexist talk", in McIlvenny, Paul, Talking gender and sexuality, Amsterdam Philadelphia: John Benjamins, pp. 151–180, ISBN 9789027251145. 
  • Speer, Susan A.; Potter, Jonathan (2007), "The management of heterosexist talk: Conversational resources and prejudiced claims", in Potter, Jonathan, Discourse and psychology: Volume II, SAGE Benchmarks in Psychology, Los Angeles: Sage, ISBN 9781412934039. 
  • Speer, Susan A.; Green, Richard (2010), "On passing: The interactional organization of appearance attributions in the psychiatric assessment of transsexual patients", in Clarke, Victoria; Peel, Elizabeth, Out in psychology: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer psychology: an introduction, Cambridge New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 335–368, ISBN 9780521700184. 
  • Speer, Susan A.; Parsons, Ceri (2007), ""Suppose it wasn't possible for you to go any further with treatment, what would you do?" Hypothetical questions in interactions between psychiatrists and transsexual patients", in Hepburn, Alexa; Wiggins, Sally, Discursive research in practice: new approaches to psychology and interaction, Cambridge New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 182–199, ISBN 9780521614092. 
  • Speer, Susan A. (2008), "Natural and contrived data", in Brannen, Julia; Alasuutari, Pertti; Bickman, Leonard, The SAGE handbook of social research methods, Los Angeles, California London: SAGE, pp. 290–312, ISBN 9781848607309. 
  • Speer, Susan A.; Hutchby, Ian (2008), "From ethics to analytics: Aspects of participants orientations to the presence and relevance of recording devices", in Hutchby, Ian, Methods in language and social interaction (Volume IV: Embodiment, modality and mediation), SAGE Benchmarks in Social Research Methods, Los Angeles London: Sage, ISBN 9781412935555. 
  • Speer, Susan A. (2009), "Passing as a transsexual woman in the gender identity clinic", in Wetherell, Margaret, Theorizing identities and social action, Identity Studies in the Social Sciences, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire England New York: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 116–138, ISBN 9780230580886. 
  • Speer, Susan A.; Hutchby, Ian (2009), "From ethics to analytics: Aspects of participants orientations to the presence and relevance of recording devices", in Fielding, Nigel G., Interviewing II (Volume I–IV), SAGE Benchmarks in Social Research Methods, London Thousand Oaks, California: Sage, ISBN 9781412928670. 
With a response by Hammersley, Martyn: 'Analytics' are no substitute for methodology: A response to Speer and Hutchby
  • Speer, Susan A. (2010), "Section II Understanding social marginalisation in LGBTQ lives: Trans and queer (Box 4.1, Key researcher: Susan Speer on why I study trans)", in Clarke, Victoria; Ellis, Sonja J.; Peel, Elizabeth; et al., Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer psychology: an introduction, Cambridge New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 89–90, ISBN 9780521700184. 
  • Speer, Susan A. (2010), "Pursuing views and testing commitments: Hypothetical questions in the psychiatric assessment of transsexual patients", in Freed, Alice; Ehrlich, Susan, Why do you ask? the function of questions in institutional discourse, Oxford New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 133–158, ISBN 9780195306903. 
  • Speer, Susan A.; Stokoe, Elizabeth (2011), "An introduction to conversation and gender", in Speer, Susan A.; Stokoe, Elizabeth, Conversation and gender, Cambridge New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 1–27, ISBN 9780521696036. 
  • Speer, Susan A. (2011), "On the role of reported, third party compliments in passing as a 'real' woman", in Speer, Susan A.; Stokoe, Elizabeth, Conversation and gender, Cambridge New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 155–182, ISBN 9780521696036. 
  • Speer, Susan A.; Goodman, Simon (2015), "Part 1: Epistemology and method interpretative repertoires: Natural and contrived data", in Tileagă, Cristian; Stokoe, Elizabeth, Discursive psychology: classic and contemporary issues, Oxford New York: Routledge, ISBN 9780415721608. 
  • Speer, Susan A. (2015), "Sexist discourse", in Tracy, Karen; Ilie, Cornelia; Sandel, Todd, The International Encyclopedia of language and social interaction, Malden, Massachusetts: International Communication Association and Wiley-Blackwell, ISBN 9781118611104. 

Journal articles[edit]

With a response: Edley, Nigel (February 2001). "Conversation analysis, discursive psychology and the study of ideology: A response to Susan Speer". Feminism & Psychology. Sage. 11 (1): 136–140. doi:10.1177/0959353501011001007. 
Rejoinder: Speer, Susan A. (February 2001). "Participants' orientations, ideology and the ontological status of hegemonic masculinity: A rejoinder to Nigel Edley". Feminism & Psychology. Sage. 11 (1): 141–144. doi:10.1177/0959353501011001008. 
With a response: Tenhave, Paul (August 2002). "Ontology or methodology? Comments on Speer's 'natural' and 'contrived' data: a sustainable distinction?". Discourse Studies. Sage. 4 (4): 527–530. doi:10.1177/14614456020040040701. 
With a response: Lynch, Michael (August 2002). "From naturally occurring data to naturally organized ordinary activities: comment on Speer". Discourse Studies. Sage. 4 (4): 531–537. doi:10.1177/14614456020040040801. 
With a response: Potter, Jonathan (August 2002). "Two kinds of natural". Discourse Studies. Sage. 4 (4): 539–542. doi:10.1177/14614456020040040901. 
Rejoinder: Speer, Susan A. (August 2002). "Transcending the 'natural'/'contrived' distinction: a rejoinder to ten Have, Lynch and Potter". Discourse Studies. Sage. 4 (4): 543–548. doi:10.1177/14614456020040041001. 
With a response: Hammersley, Martyn (May 2003). "'Analytics' are no substitute for methodology: A response to Speer and Hutchby". Sociology. Sage. 37 (2): 339–351. doi:10.1177/0038038503037002007. 
Rejoinder: Speer, Susan A.; Hutchby, Ian (May 2003). "Methodology needs analytics: A rejoinder to Martyn Hammersley". Sociology. Sage. 37 (2): 353–359. doi:10.1177/0038038503037002008. 
A response to: Sims-Schouten, Wendy; Riley, Sarah C.E.; Willig, Carla (February 2007). "Critical realism in discourse analysis: A presentation of a systematic method of analysis using women's talk of motherhood, childcare and female employment as an example". Theory & Psychology. Sage. 17 (1): 101–124. doi:10.1177/0959354307073153. 
A response to: Whelan, Pauline (October 2012). "Oxymoronic and sociologically monstrous? Feminist conversation analysis". Qualitative Research in Psychology. Taylor and Francis. 9 (4): 279–291. doi:10.1080/14780887.2011.634360. 
Rejoinder: Whelan, Pauline (October 2012). "Glossing conversation analysis with feminism?". Qualitative Research in Psychology. Taylor and Francis. 9 (4): 303–313. doi:10.1080/14780887.2011.634362. 
A response to: Miller, Paul K. (December 2012). "Arsène didn't see it: Coaching, research and the promise of a discursive psychology". International Journal of Sports Science and Coaching. Multi-Science Publishing. 7 (4): 615–635.  Pdf of pp. 615–646.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wetherell, Margaret (2009), "List of contributors xiii", in Wetherell, Margaret, Theorizing identities and social action, Identity Studies in the Social Sciences, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire England New York: Palgrave Macmillan, p. xiii, ISBN 9780230580886. 
  2. ^ Freed, Alice; Ehrlich, Susan (2010), "Contributors", in Freed, Alice; Ehrlich, Susan, Why do you ask? the function of questions in institutional discourse, Oxford New York: Oxford University Press, p. xiv, ISBN 9780195306903. 

External links[edit]